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Youngblood Turkey Trot

By
Stacey Wright,   Youngblood Intermediate School
Play:
Community Playtime – It’s Good for Everyone
Topics:
Community Involvement
Youngblood Turkey Trot
Youngblood hosted their annual Turkey Trot the week before Thanksgiving. Families were invited to join us at the Youngblood gym. We had games and activities that students could participate in with their families and then we walked around the school 2 times. All family members were invited to walk. Upon check-in, parents were given a ticket and at the end of the walk we had drawings for frozen turkeys, gift certificates, and sports equipment.

How did students and adults work together as a team?

Students and adults worked together by participating in games and activities together. We were able to get the community involved by getting them to donate water and getting the school nutrition department to donate apples so we had a healthy snack. We were able to get our teachers involved by having them donate sports equipment to give away as door prizes and having them come and participate with the students and their families.

How did you accomplish your goals?

Students and adults worked together by participating in games and activities together. We were able to get the community involved by getting them to donate water and getting the school nutrition department to donate apples so we had a healthy snack. We were able to get our teachers involved by having them donate sports equipment to give away as door prizes and having them come and participate with the students and their families.

What challenges did you face and how did you overcome them?

The challenges we faced for our Turkey Trot were time, weather, and parents working. Most of our students come from single parent families or families that both parents work. We were able to move the time to 5:00 so we had light. We had a backup plan to walk in the school if the weather didn’t cooperate. We allowed students to attend the event with any family member that was over the age of 18 so that many students could attend with grandparents, aunts, uncles, and older siblings.